When are email invites ok?

September 25th, 2017

When are email invites OK?

Times they are a changing. Phonebooks used to be thick enough to use as a booster seat. Now, with access to contact info online, they’re small enough to be stuffed into a mailbox (if printed at all). Encyclopedia door-to-door sales used to be a popular profession, yielding big sales. These days, encyclopedias themselves are nearly obsolete.

In today’s digital world, it is so common to replace printed items with digital versions; which leads me to today’s topic—when are email invites ok?

Considering that email is regarded as a casual form of conversation, it’s safe to say that email invites are ok for a casual type of event. A dinner party, corn maze adventure, child’s birthday party, bachelorette party, and community concerts are all appropriate uses for email invites.

Printed invitations, on the other hand, indicate a sense of importance and set a more formal tone for an event. Time, effort and resources are put into the development of printed invitations, and the courtesy of an RSVP, attendance, and generosity are expected.

Sample formal invitation courtesy of Keener Marketing.

Most events managed within AttendEasy would fall more into the “formal” category. They are fundraising dinners with programs, plated meals and financial giving intentions.

The invitation to these events should set these expectations. Therefore, an informal email invite is simply not the way to go for a first impression. A printed invitation will set the tone for your event and be a tangible reminder of your guests’ requested presence.

Of course, not everyone will respond right away, so following up with an email invite a week or two after the formal invitation is sent is a good idea. When using our “Send Invite” tool, you can write a personal note—mentioning the previously sent formal invitation—and request their RSVP.

Email invites alone may not only communicate the wrong expectations for your event, but they also run the risk of never being seen by recipients. Spam filters, smart folders, and growing inboxes all too often keep recipients from seeing emails.

In event planning, emailing Save the Date reminders and follow-up invites are OK, but eliminating the traditional printed invitation could be a costly mistake for your organization.

I’ve sadly heard too many stories of regret from customers who have made the mistake of replacing printed invitations with email invites. In each conversation, both attendance and giving were significantly reduced—in a couple of instances by 50 percent! 😱

In conclusion, we at Ministry Sync strongly encourage utilizing our email invitation tool to communicate with your invited guests as a follow-up to your printed invitations for your formal events.

It’s like I remind my nephews—just because you CAN, doesn’t mean you SHOULD. 🙂

 

Crystal Velte
Crystal Velte

 

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